Tag Archives: dinosaur

Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Stickland

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IMG_5266Ten Terrible Dinosaurs by Paul Stickland, paperback picture book, first published by Ragged Bear Publishing Ltd. in 1997, this edition published by Picture Corgi in 2014.

This is a cute count-down book perfect for toddlers and preschoolers. It uses simple language and large text, making it easy for young children to follow the words. The illustrations are bright and colourful. The story is funny, it rhymes, and most importantly there are dinosaurs!

My toddlers have been asking me to read Ten Terrible Dinosaurs a lot lately. They like to make roaring sounds throughout as they pretend to be the dinosaurs in the story. The repetition of the numbers has been helping them to learn the numbers, and we like to count the dinosaurs together. Knowing that the number will rhyme with the previous line has encouraged them to try to predict the next number. They also laugh every time we get to the dinosaur whose silly trick goes wrong, and when one of the dinosaurs gets stuck in a tree!

 

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Dinosaur Poo! by Diane and Christyan Fox

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IMG_1695Dinosaur Poo! by Diane and Christyan Fox, hardback picture book, published by Words & Pictures in 2014.

Dinosaurs poo all over the place, but which dinosaur has the largest (and probably smelliest) poo around? Velociraptor and Pteradacyl set out to find the biggest dinosaur poo, behind rocks, in the river and even up a tree!

Dinosaur Poo! is sure to be a hit with young and old alike. This hilarious romp through the prehistoric landscape had us laughing and giggling as we lifted the flaps to see the big smelly piles of dinosaur poo. And the ending had my kids in stitches. They wanted to read it over and over! The clear, colourful illustrations combined with funny rhyming text and lift-the-flap sections, make this an awesome book for children in preschool and lower primary school.

My kids are both obsessed with toilet humour at the moment, and they both love dinosaurs, so the combination of poo and dinosaurs was sure to be a hit in our house. I borrowed this book from the library first, but we enjoyed it so much I am going to purchase it so that we can read it any time we feel like a good laugh!

 

 

I’m a Dirty Dinosaur by Janeen Brian and Ann James

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IMG_1307I’m a Dirty Dinosaur by Janeen Brian and illustrated by Ann James, hardback picture book, published by Puffin Books in 2013.

A dinosaur who doesn’t want to wash, splashing in puddles and sliding his tail through the mud. He really is a dirty dinosaur, with dirty feet and dirty tum and dirty snout.

This funny rhyming tale of a dinosaur who loves to get muddy was very well received by my preschooler and toddler. They laughed and pretended to be the dinosaur, they also like to get very dirty and not have a bath! Suitable for preschoolers and early readers with it’s simple language and large text, this is sure to become a quick favourite. I liked the illustrations, which were simple and different, as the illustrator appears to have used actual mud to create the dirt and mud of the story. This technique is very effective. Overall, a good book for young children.

 

* I’m a Dirty Dinosaur was an honour book for the 2014 Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year in the Early Childhood category.

Using Fabric Markers

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L's beach scene singlet.

L’s beach scene singlet.

A's colourful singlet.

A’s colourful singlet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_9843The kids love to draw, so using fabric markers gave them the opportunity to create an artwork on a piece of clothing and wear it. Before they started, I placed a thick piece of cardboard inside the shirt to prevent the colour from going through to the other side of the shirt. Then I pegged the shirts to the cardboard to keep them still, making it easier to draw on.

Singlets stretched out on cardboard ready for drawing on.

Singlets stretched out on cardboard ready for drawing on.

 

A drawing on her singlet.

A drawing on her singlet.

L drawing on her singlet.

L drawing on her singlet.

Each of the kids had a singlet to draw on, and I told them to draw anything they would like. L drew a lovely picture of the beach, with people swimming, and some boats. There were also lots of seagulls, and people playing on the beach. A chose not to draw a picture, but rather used all the colours to make lines and squiggles all over her singlet. Both of the kids enjoyed making a drawing to wear.

The colouring page under the shirt.

The colouring page under the shirt.

After completing their own freestyle drawings, we tried another type of drawing. This time I printed off some colouring sheets from the Crayola site, as suggested on the back of the markers pack. L chose a picture of a dinosaur, and A chose a picture of a unicorn. I placed the colouring sheet under the shirt and traced the outline of the picture, and then let the kids colour them in. L did a very nice job colouring in her dinosaur, even adding some red blood to its teeth.

The traced dinosaur.

The traced dinosaur.

L colouring her dinosaur.

L colouring her dinosaur.

The outline of A's unicorn.

The outline of A’s unicorn.

Once the drawings were complete, we left them to dry thoroughly before heat setting them with the iron. This involved running the hot iron over the design from the opposite side for a few minutes. After which I washed and dried the shirts and singlets, and the kids could then wear their creations.

L wearing her dino shirt.

L wearing her dino shirt.

Stegosaurus Cake

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The kids have been interested (possibly obsessed) with dinosaurs for a long time. Yet again this year, L asked for a dinosaur cake for her birthday, and a dinosaur themed party. I think this is the fourth year running I have made a dinosaur cake for her. The first couple were epic dinosaur scenes, with waterfall, stream, beach, trees and lots of little figures. It took hours and hours to create, so this time I offered a simpler dinosaur cake. L asked for a stegosaurus, so a stegosaurus it was.

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Initially, Big L made two round butter cakes for me to use. I created the body, head and tail from these cakes, and then I used two halved double choc muffins for the legs. I cut one of the cakes just past the half-way point, to create the centre piece of the body, which I flanked with semi circular pieces of cake from the other cake. I shaped these pieces of cake to create a curved body. I used the left over cake to build the body into a nice dome shape, with a tail at one end and a head at the other. I know it looks a little choppy using the little pieces to get the shape I wanted, but once it is covered in butter cream, it looks very different. The cake is built up on our cake board, which is just a sheet of plywood covered in aluminium foil.

Stacked up in position.

Stacked up in position.

Stuck together with icing.

Stuck together with icing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L and A helped Big L make the butter cream icing. L now likes to use the mixer, despite years of her running from the room whenever we turned it on. A doesn’t much like the noise, but it has never stopped her from seeking out a beater to lick when the mixing is done.

L chose to make the stegosaurus purple and pink. The initial batch of blue butter cream was used to stick the loose pieces of cake together before starting the main icing of the body, and wasn’t seen on the outside of the finished cake.

I carefully spread the purple butter cream over the body, making sure not to miss any sections. I used a spatula to pat the icing all over the body to give the icing a rough texture. After I’d spread pink butter cream over the head, tail and legs, I also roughened this icing with the spatula.

The roughened texture of the butter cream on the body of the stegosaurus.

The roughened texture of the butter cream on the body of the stegosaurus.

The completed icing layer.

The completed icing layer.

Then it was time to decorate! I used square wafer biscuits as the back and tail plates. The spikes on the end of the tail were chocolate bullets. I cut some chocolate bullets in half and stuck them on the front of the legs to make toenails.

For the face, I had some fudge writing icing in the fridge, which I used to make a smile on the stegosaurus, and then we added two choc chips for eyes and two mini choc chips for nostrils. L called the finished cake Stegi, though naming it didn’t prevent her from eating any of it!

This was a really simple stegosaurus cake that the kids loved. And it tasted good too!

Stegi the Stegosaurus cake.

Stegi the Stegosaurus cake.