Tag Archives: kids craft

Rainbow Bookmarks

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I really love my laminator, it is so useful! Apart from preserving the children’s awards and other valuable mementos, it makes creating unique and durable bookmarks a breeze.

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For these fantastic rainbow bookmarks, we used colour diffusing paper (I bought it from Modern Teaching Aids). This sort of paper sucks up the colour and spreads it and mixes it, creating unusual and interesting patterns. Paper towel and coffee filters also provide a similar effect. This paper works well with water colour paints. Using felt tip markers (textas) to draw on the paper, and then using a spray bottle to wet the paper will also cause the colour to spread and mix. But for bright, vibrant colours, we always come back to using a few drops of food colouring in a small amount of water.

The kids used pipettes to place the coloured water onto the paper. They did big squirts and little drops, lines and puddles, using a range of colours. They enjoyed watching the colour spread out, and making new colours by overlapping the food colouring. They filled up each page with brilliant colour, and in A’s case, so much colour that some of the paper was actually dripping when I laid it out to dry!

A tray of food colouring and pipettes.

A tray of food colouring and pipettes.

Big spots.

Big spots.

And little dots. The blue and red puddle is mixing to give purple.

And little dots. The blue and red puddle is mixing to give purple.

Making lines.

Making lines.

 

 

 

 

 

I laid each of the wet pages out on a piece of scrap cardboard to dry flat.

 

Once these pages are dry, we can use them as beautiful and unique papers for any of our paper crafts.

Still wet paper.

Still wet paper.

Still wet. The pattern from the much mat can be seen through it.

Still wet. The pattern from the much mat can be seen through it.

 

 

A chose one sheet of paper to use for our bookmarks. The page was 30cm long, so I cut out six bookmarks, each 5cm across, by the width of the paper. I drew a faint pencil line on the back of the paper using a ruler to keep it straight, and then cut them apart. We fit three of these paper strips into an A4 laminating pocket, leaving plenty of room between the strips to make sure the plastic was properly sealed around the paper. L helped me position the laminating pocket and feed it into the laminator. It only takes a few moments for the laminating to finish, and then a few more to cool down.

The same page, dry and ready to use.

The same page, dry and ready to use.

I carefully cut the new bookmarks apart from each other, leaving a border of plastic seal around each one. I rounded the corners of each bookmark to remove the sharp point. L punched a hole in the top of each bookmark, and chose a ribbon to thread through the top. Once the ribbons were tied, the bookmarks were finished and ready to be used.

The paper cut into strips.

The paper cut into strips.

In the laminating pocket ready to be laminated.

In the laminating pocket ready to be laminated.

 

 

 

 

 

Finished bookmarks.

Finished bookmarks.

 

 

 

Paper Bowl Ladybird

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The kids are very excited by bugs at the moment, and they think ladybirds are particularly nice. They made a ladybird each from a paper bowl.

Painting.

Painting.

The faded colour of the painted bowls.

The faded colour of the painted bowls.

They started by painting their upside-down bowls with red paint. The tube stated “Rockin’ Red”, but it looked far more pink on the bowl. We did three coats of red paint on each bowl, but it still looked pinkish and thin. It’s a new tube of paint, and I’m quite disappointed in it, I was hoping for a more vibrant red for our ladybirds. No matter though, the kids still liked the colour!

Gluing on spots.

Gluing on spots.

I cut out the heads from some black foam, and the kids glued them onto the ladybirds’ bodies. They stuck on eye stickers, and added a curled black pipe cleaner for antennae. They also glued on lots of black paper dots that I had cut out earlier.

Sticking on the legs.

Sticking on the legs.

Six legs per ladybird made from black pipe cleaners, and sticky taped to the underside of the bowl, and they were finished. The kids are very proud of their new ladybird friends.

A's ladybird.

A’s ladybird.

L's ladybird.

L’s ladybird.

 

Tissue Paper Flower Art

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Sheets of tissue paper.

Sheets of tissue paper.

Spring has sprung, and A is feeling like doing lots of flowery arts and crafts at the moment. She made this delightful picture by scrunching up circular sheets of tissue paper into small balls and gluing them onto a sheet of blue paper.

Gluing down the tissue paper balls.

Gluing down the tissue paper balls.

Every time she scrunched up a piece of tissue paper, she said “Scrunching it up like I don’t want it any more.” And then she would stick it down using Clag glue. She even put a sun up in the corner to help the flowers grow. The stems, leaves and grass, she drew using green markers.

Adding grass.

Adding grass.

Paper Weaving

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IMG_1683Paper weaving is a simple activity that kids love. It can be done with just two contrasting pieces of paper. A chose a sheet of purple paper for her base, and then some green, light blue and dark blue paper for her weaving strips.

The cut base, with the edge forming the frame.

The cut base, with the edge forming the frame.

I folded the sheet of purple paper in half (short ends together), and then cut in from the folded side, leaving a couple of centimetres at the end and edges to form a frame around the edge. Each cut was about two centimetres apart, but there’s no need to be exact.

Cutting a strip of paper.

Cutting a strip of paper.

A cut some strips of coloured paper to weave through the base sheet. She made some thin and some fat. I think having uneven strips makes the finished artwork more interesting than even strips.

A started weaving strips through the cuts of the base sheet. She practiced over, under, over, under… until her strip was all the way across the base. Once she had a strip weaved through, she pushed it up against the edge of the last one, and did another one. It was a little difficult to get the last strip in, as there wasn’t much space left, so I helped her finish it off.

Weaving paper strips.

Weaving paper strips.

A added a dab of glue under the end of each strip to hold it in place. The Clag glue made the colour in the paper run a little, so we could see where the glue was even once it had dried, so next time we will use a glue stick!

Putting on some glue.

Putting on some glue.

Tissue Paper Roses

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I like having flowers on the table, it makes the house feel cheery. But then I get a bit sad when they start to wilt and go brown. Luckily, craft flowers don’t die off, so we can keep lovely bright flowers on the table at all times!

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Tissue paper circles.

Tissue paper circles.

A and I made some roses using tissue paper circles. I bought these circles in a rainbow pack, so there were lots of colours to choose from. We combined different coloured circles to make multi-coloured flowers. Each flower used five or six sheets of tissue paper.

The end of the pipe cleaner in the centre of the flower.

The end of the pipe cleaner in the centre of the flower.

The stems are half a green pipe cleaner (chenille stick). I poked the end of the pipe cleaner through the centre of the stack of tissue paper. I twisted the end of the pipe cleaner to keep it in place. Then A pushed and folded the tissue paper into a flower shape, upwards and away from the pipe cleaner stem. She twisted the base of the flower, and used sticky tape to attach it to the stem, and to keep it scrunched up in shape. We rearranged the petals of each flower to show off the different colours, and create a layered effect, like that seen on real roses.

Shaping a rose.

Shaping a rose.

Once we had a bunch of these roses, A used a cardboard roll as a makeshift vase. They look lovely sitting in the centre of our table.

Two of our roses.

Two of our roses.

Roses in a makeshift vase.

Roses in a makeshift vase.

Button Photo Frame

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The photo frame.

The photo frame.

Last week I picked up a cheap wooden photo frame from the local second hand shop. It was very plain, but in good condition. A jazzed it up for me using a selection of buttons from our button jar.

A spread all the buttons out on the table so that she could select the ones she wanted to use. In order to stick to the frame, the buttons needed to have a flat back. Then she added some glue and started sticking buttons all around the frame.

Gluing on buttons.

Gluing on buttons.

Once it was dry we put a photo of the kids with their great grandmother into the frame, and it is sitting on our dining table.

Cardboard Roll Sheep

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A loves sheep, and spends a lot of time playing with her sheep figurines. She also likes to draw and make sheep. This sheep was made with a cardboard roll and some cotton balls.

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Matchstick legs.

Matchstick legs.

We added legs to the cardboard roll first. I made some small holes and A poked a coloured matchstick into each one. Then she got to gluing on the wool, which was lots of cotton balls. She added so many cotton balls that the sheep became a little heavy for its legs! Next time I think we might need to use popsticks or something else a little sturdier for legs. Either that, or we make the sheep less woolly.

Adding wool.

Adding wool.

For the face, we used a piece of white felt. A decorated it with a mouth and nose and some googly eyes. She used a little bit of the cotton wool to make two droopy ears, and glued them to the top of the the head. Then she used some craft glue to stick the face to the body, and she had her sheep.

The sheep's head.

The sheep’s head.

A insisted it was just a baby lamb, but I think it looked more like a sheep that hadn’t been shorn for about three years!

A very woolly sheep.

A very woolly sheep.

Treasure Bottle

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The shaken bottle.

The shaken bottle.

One of the preschool classes at school made some pirate treasure bottles as part of their pirate theme. A was intrigued by the treasure bottles, and wanted to make one at home. The bottle contained a variety of items, including sand, coloured water, glitter, beads, pebbles and other crafty materials.

The bottle and some of the treasures.

The bottle and some of the treasures.

We used a clear plastic bottle to place our treasures in. Some of the treasures included plastic beads, coloured plastic, sparkly pom poms, cut up plastic straws, some broken loom bands, and lots and lots of glitter. The kids took turns adding treasures to the bottle, then I used a funnel to add silver and gold glitter. Once all our treasures were in the bottle, I filled it with water and tightened the lid. For bottle crafts like this, I normally add glue to the thread of the lid before screwing it back on too, so that the lid doesn’t accidentally come off and result in a huge mess.

Tipping the bottle upside down.

Tipping the bottle upside down.

Watching the contents settle.

Watching the contents settle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The kids squeezed the bottle, tipped it upside down, and shook it. They watched to see what sank and what floated. They watched as the contents settled and swirled. They were mesmerised.

Shell Photo Frames

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L's frame.

L’s frame.

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A’s frame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s nice to have photos displayed around our home, but most of our frames are a little boring. I picked up some plain wooden photo frames in Bunnings that we could decorate any way we pleased. We made them into shell frames.

Painting the frame white.

Painting the frame white.

First we gave the frames an undercoat of white acrylic paint. Both L and A got white paint everywhere, so I was glad we had the muck mat down. Painting the frames wasn’t vital, but I thought it would look better than the plain wood.

Pressing the gluey frame into the sand.

Pressing the gluey frame into the sand.

Once the paint was dry, the kids painted on a thick layer of PVC glue all over the front of the frame. I had placed some clean sand (sandpit sand from Bunnings) into a tray big enough for the frames to be placed face-down into the sand. The kids took turns to put their glue-covered frames into the sand. Just pressing the frame down into the sand was quite effective at getting the sand to stick to the glue. There was the occasional patch that didn’t have sand, but the kids just added a bit more glue and then sprinkled sand onto these places, and pressed the sand down.

Adding glue to a shell.

Adding glue to a shell.

We left the sandy frames to dry for long time (due to damp weather), and then we shook off any excess sand that wasn’t stuck down. Now we used PVC glue to add some small sea shells to the frames.  A put all of her shells together in one corner. She used so much glue to place her shells, it took several days to dry completely. L placed just a few shells down two sides, while I added shells randomly all over the frame I decorated.

Sticking shells down.

Sticking shells down.

These frames look very impressive, and they were fun to make. They will look even better once we get photos into them!

My shell frame.

My shell frame.

 

Sailboat

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A few weeks back Big L brought home some Mexican take away, and the quesadillas came in these wonderful cardboard containers, lined with foil, so no food had touched the cardboard. I immediately saw a boat in these containers, and put them away in the craft box for another day.

The base of the take away container.

The base of the take away container.

A and I pulled them out during the week and removed the lid from one of the containers and turned the base into a sailboat.

Placing the mast.

Placing the mast.

A joined two pop-sticks together end to end to form a mast. I made a small hole in the base of the cardboard boat to insert the mast. A then used tape to secure the mast to the base. She cut out some pink paper for her sail and taped it to the mast. I had been thinking we would just cut one of the paper squares in half diagonally to make a triangular sail, but A had other ideas, and made her own unique sail from two pieces of pink paper.

Adding the sail.

Adding the sail.

Taping on some water.

Taping on some water.

Around the outside of the base we added a layer of blue tissue paper as water for the boat to sail on.

Once her boat was finished, A put one of her dolls and a small teddy into the sailboat and took them for a ride.

Teddy and dolly ready for sailing.

Teddy and dolly ready for sailing.