Category Archives: Easter

Cardboard Roll Bunnies

Standard

IMG_9557These cute little bunnies are made from toilet rolls, but any cardboard tubes could be used. We covered the rolls with white paper first. We glued the paper to the tubes, and folded the ends inside the tube for neatness.

Making bunny ears.

Making bunny ears.

Drawing on details.

Drawing on details.

Adding a tail.

Adding a tail.

 

 

 

 

I cut out some pink cardboard for the inner sections of the white paper ears, and L glued the cardboard to the paper. The kids glued two ears into the top of their cardboard roll. Then they got busy gluing on googly eyes and using markers to add the facial features and arms. L also drew a little carrot in the hands of her bunny, which A promptly copied onto her bunny too. L drew her bunny’s feet on, but A wanted to use a white pipe cleaner as feet for her bunny. I cut two small lengths of pipe cleaner, and bent them around to form little feet, then A glued the end of them into the base of her roll.

To finish the bunnies off, the kids glued a cotton ball onto the back of the cardboard roll as a tail. While we had the cotton balls out, L had an idea for making baby bunnies. She made some ears out of paper and markers, and glued them to a cotton ball. Then she added some tiny googly eyes. She gave this baby bunny to A to play with. They called this one Baby Hopsity, and the bigger bunnies were Father and Mother Hopsity.

Baby Hopsity.

Baby Hopsity.

Cardboard Roll Chicks

Standard

IMG_9564

Gluing on the yellow paper.

Gluing on the yellow paper.

The roll covered in paper. The edges have been folded into the roll.

The roll covered in paper. The edges have been folded into the roll.

We used toilet paper rolls for these chicks, but rolls from paper towel or similar could have been cut in half to use instead. We covered the cardboard rolls in yellow paper so that the paper extended beyond the ends of the roll. We cut these sections just to the edge of the cardboard to create a fringe of paper at the ends of the roll.  Then we folded the excess paper fringe into the centre of the roll to make a neatly covered cardboard roll.

 

Adding feet.

Adding feet.

Adding eyes.

Adding eyes.

I cut out some feet shapes from orange cardboard and the kids added them to the base of their rolls. Each foot had a little tab of cardboard folded up and glued on the inside of the roll. L and A added googly eyes and the beaks were made from a small piece of pipe cleaner folded into a little triangle and glued onto the roll.

L cut down some yellow feathers to the size she wanted, and placed them on the sides of her chick for wings. She also glued a small piece of feather to the back as a tail. A cut up feathers to use on her chick too. She added wings, a tail, and some hair to her chick. Both chicks are really cute.

The back of L's chick.

The back of L’s chick.

Showing the placement of feathers on A's chick.

Showing the placement of feathers on A’s chick.

 

 

Egg Nests

Standard

IMG_9440I’ve made these little egg nests a few times in the last couple of years, but I can’t remember where the idea came from originally. They are a big hit with the kids, and really easy to make.

Mixing.

Mixing.

I’m not great at measuring things when I cook, and if I’m not following a recipe I’m even worse, so I just estimated the amounts. I used about three cups of Kelloggs rice bubbles, and about two-thirds of a packet (250g) of Cadbury white chocolate melts.

The kids put the patty pan cases into the muffin tray, and then got ready to mix the chocolate and rice bubbles. I melted the chocolate in the microwave in a ceramic bowl in thirty second bursts, stirring regularly until the chocolate was smooth. I poured it into the mixing bowl and the girls got mixing. Their wooden spoons clashed a few times, and some of the mix went flying, but they had fun, and they got the job done. It’s best to mix quickly before the chocolate cools too much.

Filling the cases.

Filling the cases.

Once mixed, we used a desert spoon and a teaspoon to place some of the mixture into each of the patty pan cases. We pushed the mixture down, and then formed a well in the centre using the teaspoon (this is where the eggs sit). Once we’d filled the muffin tray, we still had some mixture left over, so I carefully spooned it into some loose patty pan cases in the same way. All up this mixture made sixteen egg nests.

Adding the eggs.

Adding the eggs.

Then it was time to add the little eggs to the nests. These eggs are Cadbury mini-eggs which are milk chocolate on the inside with a candy coating. I like these mini-eggs because they have speckled shells, and nice colours, but I only seem to be able to get them at Easter. We have used other mini-eggs at other times of the year which were bright colours, and a little smaller than these, I think. They still worked nicely. The kids placed two or three eggs into each nest (and possibly a couple into their mouths!). The tray and the extra patty pan cases went into the fridge to set.

Once the chocolate was set these egg nest treats didn’t last long!

Ready to eat.

Ready to eat.

 

Simple Easter Basket

Standard

IMG_9366

Adding the pipe cleaner handle.

Adding the pipe cleaner handle.

We made very simple Easter baskets this year out of plastic bowls. L and A each chose a coloured bowl, and I used a single hole punch to make a hole on either side of it. Through the holes we threaded a pipe cleaner, twisting it around on itself at each side to secure it to the bowl. The pipe cleaner was the handle of the basket.

A adding stickers to the inside of her basket.

A adding stickers to the inside of her basket.

A chose to decorate her basket on the inside, adding lots of small Easter stickers around the inside, as well as some stickers on the base. L decided to put most of her stickers on the outside of her basket, with just a single bunny on the inside base. Then they were ready for the egg hunt.

The outside of L's basket.

The outside of L’s basket.

The kids ran around finding the little eggs hidden by the Easter Bunny and adding them to their baskets. The single moveable handle meant that the baskets could become unbalanced easily if the eggs were on one side of the bowl, so they had to be careful not to tip the baskets up and spill the eggs. L collected more eggs than A, so Big L helped the kids to count all of the eggs and divide them equally between them. Baby T only found two eggs, but we thought that was plenty for such a little boy. He did enjoy eating one of them very much, once I took the foil off for him.

After a successful egg hunt.

After a successful egg hunt.

Dyeing Easter Eggs

Standard

IMG_9169

L blowing out an egg.

L blowing out an egg.

A blowing out an egg.

A blowing out an egg.

Before we started this activity, I washed the eggs to remove any dirt or chicken poop from the shells. We had to blow the egg out of its shell before we could dye them, which meant making a small hole in the top of the egg, and a slightly larger hole in the other end. I was going to use a metal skewer to puncture the eggs, but I couldn’t find one, so an old-fashioned can opener did the trick. To break up the egg to make it easier to blow out, I inserted a meat thermometer and swirled it around inside for a few moments. A toothpick or wooden skewer would have also worked. Each of the kids had a go at blowing out the eggs by placing their mouth over the small opening and blowing through the egg so that the egg white and yolk was forced out the other hole into a bowl. Once all the egg came out, we ran some water into the shell and swished it about to remove any remaining traces of egg, and then blew that out too.

L dripping wax onto the eggshells.

L dripping wax onto the eggshells.

Adding wax to the shells.

Adding wax to the shells.

The eggshells needed to be dry before we added wax to them, so we dried them in a tea towel, being careful not to break them. I lit a candle with a match and let some of the wax melt. Then we dropped the wax onto each shell, making spots and lines. Melted wax is hot and can burn, so it was particularly important to do this part carefully and with adult supervision. L had a go at placing wax on the shells, but A did not, as I felt she was a bit young to do this without incidence.

The wax dried quickly on the shells, and then they were ready for dyeing. We used food colouring in cold water for this part. We placed blue colouring into a saucepan to do multiple eggshells, while other shells were placed in cups each containing red, yellow and green coloured water. Egg shells float, so to keep them down, I filled them with the water, making them sink. We left the shells to colour for about an hour.

Dyeing eggshells in cups.

Dyeing eggshells in cups.

After dyeing.

After dyeing.

Prior to removing the wax.

Prior to removing the wax.

When I removed the shells from the coloured water, we shook out as much water as we could, blew out the rest, and placed them on paper towel to help absorb any excess water. Most of the wax scraped off easily with my fingernails, and the loose wax wiped off with a tea towel. The wax protected the shell from the food colouring, creating patterns of colour and natural egg shell. Blue and red were the strongest colours, and green was light, but still good. The yellow was hardly visible at all, though looking closely, it was possible to see the pattern. The colours may have been more vivid if I had had lighter coloured eggs to work with.

The blue eggs after the wax is removed.

The blue eggs after the wax is removed.

A adding stickers to the egg basket.

A adding stickers to the egg basket.

The kids decorated a plastic ice cream container that I had covered in white paper. They added Easter stickers and some curly ribbon to make it pretty on the outside. Inside, we placed some bunched up pink tulle to make a cushion for the egg shells to lay in. This has been placed on the table as a centre-piece.

A did drop a couple of the eggshells on the floor after we were finished, and they broke open, so she learnt to be more careful handling the shells as they are only fragile.

IMG_9173

Easter Chocolates

Standard

I wanted to try making some Easter shaped chocolates this year with the kids, as I thought it would be fun. We were given a number of plastic chocolate moulds by a good friend, and my mother also gave us a silicone chocolate mould to try. We started with the silicone mould.

IMG_9124We didn’t make our own chocolate, we used choc melts, in milk chocolate and white chocolate. I melted small batches of the melts in a ceramic bowl in the microwave for about 30 seconds at a time. Each time the microwave dinged, I mixed the chocolate with a spoon to make sure that it was melting evenly and not burning on the bottom of the bowl. It’s very important to remove the spoon from the bowl before it is placed in the microwave!

Chocolate mould.

Chocolate mould.

I did not let the kids handle the bowl with the melted chocolate, as it can be very hot. I used an oven mitt to prevent burning myself on the bowl when removing it from the microwave. After a minute or two it was normally cool enough to touch, but we still had to be very careful.

Mixing the hot chocolate.

Mixing the hot chocolate.

Ready for the fridge.

Ready for the fridge.

As silicone is floppy, we used a plastic cutting board underneath the mould to prevent it from drooping and spilling the chocolate. We transferred the melted chocolate into the mould one spoonful at a time, carefully filling each hole to the top and smoothing it out. Inevitably, we dripped chocolate onto the cutting board, mould and even on the bench. The kids didn’t mind swiping it up on a finger and popping it in their mouths. Once all the holes on the mould were filled, we placed it in the fridge to set.

Placing the chocolates onto the cellophane.

Placing the chocolates onto the cellophane.

We made some plain milk chocolate, some white chocolate, and some we mixed together to marble the chocolate. I also had a go at layering the chocolate. I found it was best to let the first layer set in the fridge for about fifteen minutes before adding the second layer.

Forming a bundle.

Forming a bundle.

The kids cut some cellophane into squares and placed about four chocolates onto each square, then brought the cellophane up around the chocolates creating a little bundle. We added some curling ribbon to tie it up, and I curled it with scissors. L tried to curl her own ribbon, but she didn’t quite manage it. They want to give their little parcels of Easter chocolates to relatives.

Little parcels of Easter chocolates.

Little parcels of Easter chocolates.

Arrowroot Biscuit Easter Eggs

Standard

IMG_9084We go through a lot of milk arrowroot biscuits in our house, especially baby T, he loves them!

Biscuits and 100s and 1000s ready for decorating.

Biscuits and 100s and 1000s ready for decorating.

Milk arrowroots are oval shaped, and close enough to egg-shaped that we tried decorating them to make some non-chocolate Easter eggs. The icing is quite sweet though, so these aren’t a less sugary alternative to chocolate eggs, but they were fun to make.

I mixed up some icing sugar with a little bit of milk in a bowl, and then I transferred some to a zip lock snack bag. I added some vanilla essence and some food colouring to the bag, sealed it, and squished it all together to mix it. When it was ready to use, I snipped a tiny triangle off one corner so that we could use it as a piping bag. I added a bit too much milk to the first lot of icing so it was a little runny, but the other lots were a better consistency for piping.

Spreading icing with a knife.

Spreading icing with a knife.

Piping icing onto a biscuit.

Piping icing onto a biscuit.

The kids used the icing bags to spread icing across the top of the biscuits, on some making patterns with the colours, on others just covering the whole biscuit in the same colour. On some of them they used a knife to spread the icing out. They added some 100s and 1000s to the top of the biscuits, and some they even dipped in the bowl of 100s and 1000s to completely cover the top.

IMG_9078

This was a very messy activity! There was icing, 100s and 1000s and icing sugar everywhere (including all over the kids), but they had a ball. They also enjoyed eating some of their biscuit eggs along the way 🙂

The mess at the end.

The mess at the end.

Paper Plate Rabbit

Standard

A made a paper plate rabbit today. It has paper ears, a button for a nose, googly eyes, a pipe cleaner mouth and little pom pom teeth.

IMG_8956

Adding a button nose.

Adding a button nose.

I cut out the ears for A, and she glued them together. Once she had glued the ears to the top of the paper plate, they were a bit floppy, so we added a couple of popsticks behind the ears to keep them upright. A glued down the nose, eyes, mouth and teeth, and then left it to dry.

Adding popsticks to keep the ears up.

Adding popsticks to keep the ears up.

We used the hole punch to put a hole in the plate between the ears and added some string so that it could be hung up in her room. This was pretty simple and quick, and A is very happy with her rabbit.

Pom Pom Bunnies and Chicks

Standard

 

IMG_8836When we went into Riot Art & Craft last week they had a large display of Easter crafts, including some little craft kits. Each of the kids picked out a pom pom critter kit to make at home. L chose mini chicks and bunnies, and A chose some chicks.

IMG_8818IMG_8819There were some instructions on the back of the pack, but it would have been possible to complete the pom pom critters from the picture alone, given what was in each kit. We had to cut up some of the pipe cleaners to the right length, but otherwise everything was ready to go.

 

Adding the chick's bunny ears headband.

Adding the chick’s bunny ears headband.

L got started on hers straight away, getting the beak and little puffy cheeks onto her chicks. A asked that I help her with the glue, and making the pipe cleaners into the right shapes. Once I’d placed the glue, she put the pieces together carefully.

One of L’s mini bunnies experienced a small accident which left its face elongated, so L started calling it the ele-bunny. I think she just damaged the pom pom, making it a weird shape.

L's mini bunnies and mini chicks.

L’s mini bunnies and mini chicks.

It was a fun way to pass an hour or so, and once the pom pom critters dried, the kids had great fun playing with them. A even took her chicks to bed with her and cuddled them to sleep.

IMG_8850

 

Bunny Ears

Standard
A as a cute little bunny.

A as a cute little bunny.

After the bunny cake was all eaten last week, I was left with the felt and foam ears. We decided to put them to good use making some bunny ear headbands for the kids to wear.

White felt ears.

White felt ears.

We had to make another set of ears for the second headband. L glued the pink foam onto the white felt to make the ears, and then we left them to dry.

Bunny ears ready for gluing.

Bunny ears ready for gluing.

I cut some strips of cardboard and stapled them together to the right size for the kids’ heads. Then the kids glued their ears onto the cardboard band. They placed the base of the ears behind the cardboard at the front of the headband so that the pink foam sections were lined up against the cardboard.

Sticking the ears to the headband.

Sticking the ears to the headband.

Once the headbands were completely dry, the kids placed them on their heads and hopped all around the house just like rabbits.

L being a mischievous little bunny.

L being a mischievous little bunny.